By Adriana Paredes MA MEd. Staff writer for SAI

The scientific world is celebrating a milestone as Curiosity the Mars Science Laboratory rover, NASA’s $2.5 billion mission, touched down inside the Red Planet’s Gale Crater on the night of Aug. 5. The six-wheeled rover’s main task is to determine if Mars is, or ever was, capable of supporting microbial life. Its’ target is the base of Mount Sharp, the 3.4-mile-high (5.5 kilometers) mountain that rises from the center of Gale Crater. Signs of clays and sulfates have been spotted by Mars orbiting spacecraft in Mount Sharp’s lower reaches, suggesting the mound’s base was exposed to liquid water long ago.

But what does this mean to the rest of the world? What kind of impact will Curiosity bring to our everyday lives if the mission proves successful? Will it inspire us to finally understand that we are not isolated as we think we are? Will this change our behavior towards others living in the same planet who we may consider strangers and possibly enemies?

According to Barbara Martin, (internationally renowned clairvoyant, award-winning author, and spiritual teacher), “Metaphysical teaches that the other planets in the solar system exert an influence on us here on Earth. In a very real sense, the entire solar system is our home, not just Earth.” Dimitri Moraitis (co-author and executive director of Spiritual Arts Institute) adds, “The whole question of life outside Earth in the universe is ironic, because, spiritually speaking, the universe itself is alive. It’s only a matter of time until modern science catches up with this truth.”

The excitement has risen as new photos have arrived, and many have compare Curiosity’s pictures of Mars to the Navajo desert.  These discoveries can help us realize how intertwine our lives are with all life and make us engage in a respectful relationship with every being that exists in our own blue planet. Maybe then the mission of Curiosity would open new doors in human consciousness and understanding.